?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry


I noticed this letter written by a developer which looked like this to me, "Blah blah blah blee bloo." He's just mad that people are protesting and protecting the land which prevents him from making a quick profit and I don't blame them (the protestors) because they (the invaders) fucking raped Kona on the Big Island:


Activists ruining Kona progress


The meeting notice at Kona-waena School Sunday, June 26, invited all who "support" the Hokuli'a project stalled by anti-development activists. It was a quest for positive dialogue — instead of endless negativism from activists, who, of course, showed up in force, got the microphone and unleashed a diatribe as their followers cheered, then rudely jeered folks with constructive ideas — some of whom had no time to speak and walked out.


The anti-development activists allege conspiracy between Hawai'i County and landowners and other fantasies, including claims that Hokuli'a and development in general are responsible for Kona's homeless, substance-abuse problems, etc. The activists try to divide the community with inflammatory fabrication, misinformation and a lawsuit attacking the county for approving development of the Hokuli'a project.


Hokuli'a, a billion-dollar project, spent many millions relying on county approval, including building a major public highway. Many innocent purchasers bought lots at Hokuli'a to build homes on and participate in an agricultural-use program. All is stopped at Hokuli'a and the new highway.


The lawsuit/shutdown resulted in anti-business repercussions for Kona nationwide. Can you imagine buying a lot for $1 million, starting to build a home on it and then being told that you can't finish constructing the home or live in it — but of course you must still make your mortgage payments on it?



Other anti-development activist strategies have stalled community public works projects, and recently the county lost millions in federal highway fund contributions as a result. The activists don't seem to care about the community, just stopping development.


The anti-development activists say Hokuli'a should have asked the state to change its land-use designation from ag to urban — even though the county already gave Hokuli'a approval to develop one-acre ag-sized lots and Hokuli'a agreed to create new ag activity on its land. Don't activists realize that if the designation was changed from ag to urban, there would be no ag use incentive for Hokuli'a or its lot owners and the lots would likely be smaller than the one-acre minimum allowed in any ag zone? The Hokuli'a project was approved under an ag designation, ensuring at least some ag activity.


Respected Kona rancher William Paris testified how marginal, nonproductive the land was for many years before Hokuli'a. The public never had good access to the land or shoreline here. Hokuli'a's project includes a beautiful oceanfront public park and public facilities where none existed before. Yes, Hokuli'a has golf and much open space. It's beautiful, idyllic compared to its former dry, rocky, barren terrain. It's a good neighbor and asset to the community.


Hawai'i did experience unchecked development in the 1950s and '60s but since then has had increasingly responsible county planners overseeing zoning/development approvals. No system is perfect, and all development is not bad. Hawai'i County would be insolvent today if responsible ranchers had not sold marginal ag land to good developers along the Kona/Kohala coast. Proceeds from such land sales helped enhance and diversify family ranching operations.


Development can be, should be win-win for everyone. We should be focusing on positive ways to support responsible use of marginal ag lands.


John Michael White
President, Hawaii Land Co.


Seen at http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/current/op/letters

Profile

Yo!
haolegirl
For my family and friends ™
Website

Latest Month

January 2015
S M T W T F S
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Tiffany Chow