April 4th, 2005

Buddha

On Chinese Culture in Hawai'i

I'm one-eighth Chinese and I belong to the Tom Society in Hawai'i. Who would have guessed considering that I look like uh... a Haole Girl LOL Anyway Ching Ming starts tomorrow:


Jeanette Young, widow of George Chew Kai Young, and James C.M. Young, George's brother, gathered with others yesterday at Manoa Chinese Cemetery. George Young is credited with taking Ching Ming from small family gatherings to a grand cultural celebration.


From left, Danny S.M. Young, vice chairman of the United Chinese Society; Harry Wong, one of the coordinators for the Ching Ming celebration; Jeanette Young; and James C.M. Young at Manoa Chinese Cemetery, where many will gather Wednesday.

An excerpt:

"Hawai'i's Chinese communities this week are preparing for the annual Ching Ming ceremonies to honor their departed forebears, with events planned in Manoa, Kane'ohe and by individual families at gravesites across the state.

Jeanette Young, widow of George Chew Kai Young, and James C.M. Young, George's brother, gathered with others yesterday at Manoa Chinese Cemetery. George Young is credited with taking Ching Ming from small family gatherings to a grand cultural celebration.

"We've been brought up with the respect for our parents and ancestors," said Harry Wong, one of the coordinators for the Ching Ming celebration at Manoa Chinese Cemetery on Wednesday. "We appreciate what they have done for us and it is important to pass this on to our children. There is a Chinese saying: 'When you drink the water, reflect on the source.' "


Ching Ming is an observance rooted in Taoist religion, in which families gather at cemeteries to clean and decorate ancestors' gravesites and present them with offerings of incense and traditional foods. It's an occasion to show respect and eat together — the living and, symbolically, those visiting from the spirit world.

Ching Ming, also spelled Quin Ming but pronounced the same, has been observed in China for about 3,000 years. The monthlong observance begins tomorrow."


Source: http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2005/Apr/04/ln/ln17p.html

Cross-posted to abouthawaii
Yo!

Princess Ruth Ke'elikōlani

Unfortunately many Hawaiians sometimes forget about her, Princess Ruth Ke'elikōlani (pronounced "keh-eh-leeh-koh-lah-neeh" for the Hawaiian language challenged.) Granted, to many her physical attributes are considered "unattractive" by many. However she is a reason why so many Hawaiian children are surviving. Unfortunately she doesn't get the recognition that she deserves. Personally I think that she is one of the most beautiful women in the world because she helped Hawaiian children. (Actually any woman who helps children is super beautiful to me.)

Who is she?

Ruth Ke'elikōlani, also known as Princess Ruth was born in 1826. She was a member of both the Kamehameha Dynasty and Kalākaua Dynasty, and Governor of the Island of Hawai'i. She became the largest landholder in the Kingdom of Hawai'i, owner of lands that would later become part of the present-day Kamehameha Schools/Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate as well as the estate of Sam Parker. Without her land or... if it weren't for her land then Princess Pauahi would not have been able to create the Kamehameha Schools.

Do they teach about her at Kamehameha?

I don't remember them stressing how important she is to the Kamehameha Schools. It was more like they glossed over her contributions.

Do they mention her when discussing Kamehameha Schools?

Well in today's paper they didn't mention her:

http://starbulletin.com/2005/04/04/features/story2.html

An excerpt:

"What does Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop mean to you?"

They should have also asked, "What does Princess Ke'elikōlani mean to you?"

Cross-posted to hawaiians