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* In this article these two images show the effect of war on a Hawaiian who served in Iraq. In this article, he is described as a warrior. However, that's already understood or obvious to many Hawaiians considering that most if not all Hawaiians are related to a chief or cheifs in some way. For those who are interested in Hawaiian history, every Hawaiian is related to a chief so technically they are of royal lineage. More importantly, many Hawaiians are warriors and in some cases... Kamehameha Warriors. (Hoe graduated from Kamehameha Schools as in "Kamehameha Warriors.") Anyway interesting pictures and article:





Seen at http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2005/Feb/08/ln/ln14p.html

Cross-posted to hawaiians

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( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
liamstliam
Feb. 8th, 2005 11:08 pm (UTC)
Just curious.

How accurate are the spear-men in their dress?

Is that something common at Hawaiian funerals or did it have to do with his race/ethnicity?

I am sorry if these questions sound clumsy.

Liam
haolegirl
Feb. 10th, 2005 12:34 am (UTC)
No... it's okay. I don't mind. The spears are "authentic" but the clothes are not. Ancient Hawaiians were usually partially nude or covered with cloth like ka'ai which was "protective cloth." The draped fabric that I see here looks like it's Americanized but in ancient Hawai they use "malo" which was usually made out of wauke (pronounced "vow-keh" or "wow-keh" depending on "dialect" and/or location) or mamaki (or "bark.) Malo is loan cloth.

The spears look as though they are the long ones which are called "pololu" (pronounced "poh-loh-looooooooo") (versus the short ones which can be called "'elau" pronounced "EH-low.")

For the most part it's common nowadays to have these at funerals especially when someone who is Hawaiian dies. However there is so much more like wailing if the person is an ali'i. Generally though it's common to find Hawaiians dressed that way though covered up due to recent American laws that forbid us to be nude in public or partially nude.

A good book is "Nana I Ke Kumu" which means "Look to the source. Authir is Mary Kawena Pukui et al. It covers many of practices, beliefs, customs, etc of Hawaiians. Fortunately it's available from amazon.com and from many other major bookstores and makes for very good reading :)
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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